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Hello my name is Jerral Campfield and this web site is dedicated to Moral Recognition Therapy using Biblical principles. Please come back often to join me in understanding Gods hands are outstretched still to forgive.

WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE
Contributed by Jerral Campfield   
Friday, 07 August 2020

Here in John 16 we have seen the work of Jesus describe what is happening now in 1-6 then the Power of the Holy Spirit working among us from 7-13 then Sorrow turn to joy in 16 to 24 then last Sunday as overcome the world to now What do you believe!
29 His disciples said to Him, “See, now You are speaking plainly, and using no figure of speech! 30 Now we are sure that You know all things, and have no need that anyone should question You. By this we believe that You came forth from God.”
31 Jesus answered them, “Do you now believe? 32 Indeed the hour is coming, yes, has now come, that you will be scattered, each to his [e]own, and will leave Me alone. And yet I am not alone, because the Father is with Me.33 These things I have spoken to you, that in Me you may have peace. In the world you [f]will have tribulation; but be of good cheer, I have overcome the world.”
Two things Christ here comforts his disciples with:
I. With an assurance that, though he was leaving the world, he was returning to his Father, from whom he came forth John 16:28-32, where we have,
1. A plain declaration of Christ’s mission from the Father, and his return to him (John 16:28): I came forth from the Father, and am come, as you see, into the world. Again, I leave the world, as you will see shortly, and go to the Father. This is the conclusion of the whole matter. There was nothing he had more inculcated upon them than these two things—whence he came, and whither he went, the Alpha and Omega of the mystery of godliness (1 Tim. 3:16), that the Redeemer, in his entrance, was  16 And without controversy great is the [a]mystery of godliness:

God[b] was manifested in the flesh, Justified in the Spirit,Seen by angels,  Preached among the Gentiles,  Believed on in the world, Received up in glory.
 
(1.) These two great truths are here, [1.] Contracted, and put into a few words. Brief summaries of Christian doctrine are of great use to young beginners. The principles of the oracles of God brought into a little compass in creeds and catechisms have, like the beams of the sun contracted in a burning glass, conveyed divine light and heat with a wonderful power. Such we have, much in a little. Job 28:28; And to man He said, ‘Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom, And to depart from evil is understanding.’ 

Ecclesiastes 12:13  Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear God and keep His commandments, For this is man’s all.
1 Timothy 1:15 This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am chief. 
Titus 2:11 Trained by Saving Grace 11 For the grace of God that brings salvation has appeared to all men, 
Titus 2:12  teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly in the present age, 
1 John 5:11  And this is the testimony: that God has given us eternal life, and this life is in His Son. Contracted now
 [2.] Compared, and set the one over against the other. There is an admirable harmony in divine truths; they both corroborate and illustrate one another; Christ’s coming and his going do so. Christ had commended his disciples for believing that he came forth from God (John 16:27), for the Father Himself loves you, because you have loved Me, and have believed that I came forth from God. Thence infers the necessity and equity of his returning to God again, which therefore should not seem to them either strange or sad. Note, the due improvement of what we know and own would help us into the understanding of that which seems difficult and doubtful.
(2.) If we ask concerning the Redeemer whence he came, and whither he went, we are told, [1.] That he came from the Father, who sanctified and sealed him; and he came into this world, this lower world, this world of mankind, among whom by his incarnation he was pleased to incorporate himself. Here his business lay, and hither he came to attend it. He left his home for this strange country; his palace for this cottage; wonderful condescension! [2.] That, when he had done his work on earth, he left the world, and went back to his Father at his ascension. He was not forced away, but made it his own act and deed to leave the world, to return to it no more till he comes to put an end to it; yet still he is spiritually present with his church, and will be to the end.
2. The disciples’ satisfaction in this declaration (John 16:29, 30): His disciples said to Him, See, now You are speaking plainly, and using no figure of speech! 30 Now we are sure that You know all things, and have no need that anyone should question You. By this we believe that You came forth from God.
Lo, now speakest though plainly. It should seem, this one word of Christ did them more good than all the rest, though he had said many things likely enough to fasten upon them. The Spirit, as the wind, blows when and where, and by what word he pleases; perhaps a word that has been spoken once, yea twice, and not perceived, yet, being often repeated, takes hold at last. Two things they improved in by this saying:—
(1.) In knowledge: Lo, now speakest thou plainly. When they were in the dark concerning what he said, they did not say, Lo, now speakest thou obscurely, as blaming him; but now that they apprehend his meaning they give him glory for condescending to their capacity: Lo, now speakest thou plainlyDivine truths are most likely to do good when they are spoken plainly, 1 Cor. 2:4. And my speech and my preaching were not with persuasive words of [a]human wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power,
 Observe how they triumphed, as the mathematician did with his joy of discouvery, when he had hit upon a demonstration he had long been in quest of: I have found it, I have found it. Note, When Christ is pleased to speak plainly to our souls, and to bring us with open face to behold his glory, we have reason to rejoice in it.
(2.) In faith: Now are we sure. Observe,
[1.] What was the matter of their faith: We believe that thou camest forth from GodHe had said (John 16:27) that they did believe this; “Lord” (say they) “we do believe it, and we have cause to believe it, and we know that we believe it, and have the comfort of it.”
[2.] What was the motive of their faith—his omniscience. This proved him a teacher come from God, and more than a prophet, that he knew all things, which they were convinced of by this that he resolved those doubts which were hid in their hearts, and answered the scruples they had not confessed. Note, Those knowing Christ best know him by experience, that can say of his power, It works in me; of his love, He loved me. And this proves Christ not only to have a divine mission, but to be a divine person, that he is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart, therefore the essential, eternal Word, Heb. 4:12, 13.  For the word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the division of soul and spirit, and of joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. And there is no creature hidden from His sight, but all things are naked and open to the eyes of Him to whom we must give account
 
 He has made all the churches to know that he searches the reins and the heart, Rev. 2:23 I will kill her children with death, and all the churches shall know that I am He who searches[a] the minds and hearts. And I will give to each one of you according to your works.
This confirmed the faith of the disciples here, as it made the first impression upon the woman of Samaria that Christ told her in John 4:29
 “Come, see a Man who told me all things that I ever did. Could this be the Christ?
 and upon Nathanael that Christ saw him under the fig-tree, John 1:48, 49. 48 Nathanael said to Him, How do You know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you. 49 Nathanael answered and said to Him, Rabbi, You are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!
These words, and needest not that any man should ask thee, may bespeak either, FirstChrist’s aptness to teach. He provides us with his instructions, and is communicative of the treasures of wisdom and knowledge that are hid in him, and needs not to be importuned. Or, SecondlyHis ability to teach: “Thou needest not, as other teachers, to have the learners’ doubts told thee, for thou knowest, without being told, what they stumble at.” The best of teachers can only answer what is spoken, but Christ can answer what is thought, what we are afraid to ask, as the disciples were, Mark 9:32. 32 But they did not understand this saying, and were afraid to ask Him.
Thus he can have compassion, Heb. 5:2. He can [a]have compassion on those who are ignorant and going astray, since he himself is also subject to weakness.
3. The gentle rebuke Christ gave the disciples for their confidence that they now understood him,

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OVERCOMING THE WORLD
Contributed by Jerral Campfield   
Saturday, 01 August 2020

Oercome the World
25 “These things I have spoken to you in figurative language; but the time is coming when I will no longer speak to you in figurative language, but I will tell you plainly about the Father. 26 In that day you will ask in My name, and I do not say to you that I shall pray the Father for you; 27 for the Father Himself loves you, because you have loved Me, and have believed that I came forth from God. 28 I came forth from the Father and have come into the world. Again, I leave the world and go to the Father.” VERSES 23-27
Here Jesus is answering to their question with a promised, for their further comfort. Now there are two ways of asking: asking by way of enquiry, which is the asking of the ignorant; and asking by way of request, which is the asking of the indigent. Christ here speaks of both.
I. By way of enquiry, they should not need to ask (John 16:23): “In that day you shall ask me nothing;” ouk erotesete oudenyou shall ask no questions; “you shall have such a clear knowledge of gospel mysteries, by the opening of your understandings, that you shall not need to enquire” (as Heb. 8:11 11 None of them shall teach his neighbor, and none his brother, saying, ‘Know the Lord,’ for all shall know Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them. “you shall have more knowledge on a sudden than hitherto you have had by diligent attendance.” They had asked some ignorant questions (as John 9:2)And His disciples asked Him, saying, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?”
 
Then Matthew records At that time the disciples came to Jesus, saying, “Who then is greatest in the kingdom of heaven?”
Some distrustful ones (as Matt. 19:27)  Then Peter answered and said to Him, “See, we have left all and followed You. Therefore what shall we have?”
 Some impertinent ones, (as John 21:20 & 21) 20 Then Peter, turning around, saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following, who also had leaned on His breast at the supper, and said, “Lord, who is the one who betrays You?” 21 Peter, seeing him, said to Jesus, “But Lord, what about this man?”
 
, some curious ones (as Acts 1:6 Therefore, when they had come together, they asked Him, saying, “Lord, will You at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?”
 But after the Spirit was poured out, nothing of all this. In the story of the apostles’ Acts we seldom find them asking questions, as David, Shall I do this? Or, Shall I go thither? For they were constantly under a divine guidance. In that weighty case of preaching the gospel to the Gentiles, Peter went, nothing doubting, Acts 10:20. Asking questions supposes us at a loss, or at least at a stand, and the best of us have need to ask questions; but we should aim at such a full assurance of understanding that we may not hesitate, but be constantly led in a plain path both of truth and duty.
Now for this he gives a reason (John 16:25)  “These things I have spoken to you in figurative language; but the time is coming when I will no longer speak to you in figurative language, but I will tell you plainly about the Father. which plainly refers to this promise, that they should not need to ask questions: “These things have I spoken unto you in proverbs, in such a way as you have thought not so plain and intelligible as you could have wished, but the time cometh when I shall show you plainly, as plainly as you can desire, of the Father, so that you shall not need to ask questions.”
1. The great thing Christ would lead them into was the knowledge of God: “I will show you the Father, and bring you acquainted with him.” This is that which Christ designs to give and which all true Christians desire to have. When Christ would express the greatest favor intended for his disciples, he tells them that it would, show them plainly of the Father; for what is the happiness of heaven, but immediately and everlastingly to see God? To know God as the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ is the greatest mystery for the understanding to please God as we know him as our Father, is the greatest happiness doing the Father will with the love for Godliness as or choice. 
2. In the old Testament He spoken to them in proverbs, which are wise and instructive sayings, but figurative, and resting in generals. Christ had spoken many things very plainly to them, and expounded his parables privately to the disciples, but, (1.) Considering their dulness, and unaptness to receive what he said to them, he might be said to speak in proverbs; what he said to them was as a book sealed, Isa. 29:11. 11 The whole vision has become to you like the words of a [a]book that is sealed, which men deliver to one who is literate, saying, “Read this, please.” And he says, “I cannot, for it is sealed.”
  (2.) Comparing the discoveries he had made to them, in what he had spoken to their ears, with what he would make to them when he would put his Spirit into their heart, all hitherto had been proverbs. It would be a pleasing surprise to themselves, and they would think themselves in a new world, when they would reflect upon all their former notions as confused and enigmatical, compared with their present clear and distinct knowledge of divine things. The ministration of the letter was nothing to that of the Spirit, 2 Cor. 3:8-11.  how will the ministry of the Spirit not be more glorious? For if the ministry of condemnation had glory, the ministry of righteousness exceeds much more in glory. 10 For even what was made glorious had no glory in this respect, because of the glory that excels. 11 For if what is passing away was glorious, what remains is much more glorious.
 (3.) Confining it to what he had said of the Father, and the counsels of the Father. what he had said was very dark, compared with what was shortly to be revealed, Col. 2:2.
3. He would speak to them plainly, parresiawith freedom, of the Father. When the Spirit was poured out, the apostles attained to a much greater knowledge of divine things than they had before, as appears by the utterance the Spirit gave them, Acts 2:4. that their hearts may be encouraged, being knit together in love, and attaining to all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the knowledge of the mystery of God, [a]both of the Father and of Christ.
 They were led into the mystery of those things of which they had previously a very confused idea; and what the Spirit showed them Christ is here said to show them, for, as the Father speaks by the Son, so the Son by the Spirit. But this promise will have its full accomplishment in heaven, where we shall see the Father as he is, face to face, not as we do now, through a glass darkly (1 Cor. 13:12)  For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part, but then I shall know just as I also am known.
This is a matter of comfort to us under the cloud of present darkness, by reason of which we cannot order our speech, but often disorder it. While we are here, we have many questions to ask concerning the invisible God and the invisible world; but in that day we shall see all things clearly, and ask no more questions.
II. He promises that by way of request they should ask nothing in vain. it is taken for granted that all Christ’s disciples give themselves to prayer. He has taught them by his precept and pattern to be much in prayer; this must be their support and comfort when he had left them; their instruction, direction, strength, and success, must be fetched in by prayer. Now,
1. Here is an express promise of a grant, John 16:23. 23 “And in that day you will ask Me nothing. Most assuredly, I say to you, whatever you ask the Father in My name He will give you.
  The preface to this promise is such as makes it inviolably sure, and leaves no room to question it: “Verily, verily, I say unto you, I pledge my veracity upon it.” The promise itself is incomparably rich and sweet; the golden sceptre is here held out to us, with the word, What is thy petition, and it shall be grantedFor he says, Whatsoever you shall ask the Father in my name, he will give it to you. We had it before, John 14:1313 And whatever you ask in My name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.

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"SORROW WILL TURN TO JOY"
Contributed by Jerral Campfield   
Friday, 24 July 2020

Sorrow Will Turn to Joy
16 “A little while, and you will not see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me, because I go to the Father.”
17 Then some of His disciples said among themselves, “What is this that He says to us, ‘A little while, and you will not see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me’; and, ‘because I go to the Father’?” 18 They said therefore, “What is this that He says, ‘A little while’? We do not [d]know what He is saying.”
19 Now Jesus knew that they desired to ask Him, and He said to them, “Are you inquiring among yourselves about what I said, ‘A little while, and you will not see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me’? 20 Most assuredly, I say to you that you will weep andlament, but the world will rejoice; and you will be sorrowful, but your sorrow will be turned into joy. 21 A woman, when she is in labor, has sorrow because her hour has come; but as soon as she has given birth to the child, she no longer remembers the anguish, for joy that a human being has been born into the world. 22 Therefore you now have sorrow; but I will see you again and your heart will rejoice, and your joy no one will take from you.
23 “And in that day you will ask Me nothing. Most assuredly, I say to you, whatever you ask the Father in My name He will give you. 24 Until now you have asked nothing in My name. Ask, and you will receive, that your joy may be full.
VERSES 16-22
Our Lord Jesus, for the comfort of his sorrowful disciples, here promises that he would visit them again.
John 16:16. Here he tells them, 1. That they should now shortly lose the sight of him: A little while, and you that have seen me so long, and still desire to see me, shall not see me; and therefore, if they had any good question to ask him, they must ask quickly, for he was now taking his leave of them. Note, It is good to consider how near to a period our seasons of grace we are in, that we may be quickened to improve them while He is still speaking to us. Now our eyes see our teachers, see the days of the Son of man; but, perhaps, yet a little while, and we shall not see them. They lost the sight of Christ, (1.) At his death, when he withdrew from this world, and never after showed himself openly in it. The most that death does to our Christian friends is to take them out of our sight, not out of being, not out of bliss, but out of all relation to us, only out of sight, and then not out of mind. (2.) At his ascension, when he withdrew from them while conversing with Him),He went out of their sight; a cloud received him, and, though they looked up steadfastly after him, they saw him no more, Acts 1:9, 10; Now when He had spoken these things, while they watched, He was taken up, and a cloud received Him out  of their sight. 10 And while they looked steadfastly toward heaven as He went up, behold, two men stood by them in white apparel. Then in the Old Testament when Elijah went to heaven in a Chariot.
 2 Kgs. 2:12And Elisha saw it, and he cried out, “My father, my father, the chariot of Israel and its horsemen!” So he saw him no more. And he took hold of his own clothes and tore them into two pieces. We see in 2 Cor. 5:16 Therefore, from now on, we regard no one according to the flesh. Even though we have known Christ according to the flesh, yet now we know Him thus no longer.
 
2. It is hard to imagine Again a little while, and you shall see me, and therefore you ought not to sorrow as those that have no hope. His farewell was not a final farewell; they should see him again, (1.) At his resurrection, soon after his death, when he showed himself alive, by many infallible proofs, and this in a very little while, not forty hours. See Hos. 6:2 After two days He will revive us; On the third day He will raise us up,
That we may live in His sight. Then 40 days after He appeared to mankind He tells them, I am going to pour out the Spirit which is going to convict the world of wrong doing so you will have a greater insight of the mysteries of the Gospel of Christ which they had not had yet, for Jesus walked and talked to them in person.
That we may live in His sight. Then 40 days after He appeared to mankind He tells them, I am going to pour out the Spirit which is going to convict the world of wrong doing so you will have a greater insight of the mysteries of the Gospel of Christ which they had not had yet, for Jesus walked and talked to them in person.
The Spirits coming was Christs visit to his disciples, not a transient but a permanent one, and such a visit as abundantly retrieved the sight of him. (3.) At his second coming. They saw him again as they removed one by one to him at death, and they shall see him together at the end of time, when he shall come in the clouds, and every eye shall see him. It might be truly said of this that it was but a little while, and they should see him; for what are the days of time, to the days of eternity? 2 Pet. 3:8, 9 But, beloved, do not forget this one thing, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward [c]us, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance.
3. He assigns the reason: Because I go to the Father; and therefore,(1.) I must leave you for a time, because my business calls me to the upper world, and you must be content to spare me, for really my business is yours. (2.) Therefore you shall see me again shortly, for the Father will not detain me to your prejudice. If I go upon your errand, you shall see me again as soon as my business is done, as soon as is convenient.
It should seem, all this refers rather to his going away at death, and return at his resurrection, than his going away at the ascension, and his return at the end of time; for it was his death that was their grief, not his ascension (Luke 24:52,53 ), And they worshiped Him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy,  and were continually in the temple [n]praising and blessing God. [o]Amen. So between his death and resurrection it was indeed a little whilefor a little while you shall not see me, namely, the three days of his lying in the grave; and again, for a little while you shall see me, namely, the forty days between his resurrection and ascension. 
II. The perplexity of the disciples upon the intimation given them; they were at a loss what to make of it What is this that he saith to us? Though Christ had often spoken to this time before, yet still they were in the dark; though precept be upon precept, it is in vain, unless God gave the understanding. Now see, 1. The disciples weakness, in that they could not understand so plain a saying, to which Christ had already given them a key, having told them so often in plain terms that he should be killed, and the third day rise again; yet, say they, We cannot tell what he saith; for, (1.) Sorrow had filled their heart, and made them unapt to receive the impressions of comfort. The darkness of ignorance and the darkness of melancholy commonly increase and thicken one another; mistakes cause griefs, and then griefs confirm mistakes. (2.) The notion of Christs secular kingdom was so deeply rooted in them that they could make no sense at all of those sayings of his which they knew not how to reconcile with that notion. When we think the scripture must be made to agree with the false ideas we have imbibed, no wonder that we complain of difficulty; but when our reasonings are captivated to revelation, the matter becomes easy. (3.) It should seem, that which puzzled them was the little while. If he must go at least, yet they could not conceive how he should leave them quickly, when his stay hitherto had been so short, and so little while, comparatively. Thus it is hard for us to represent to ourselves that change as near which yet we know will come certainly, and may come suddenly. When we are told, Yet a little while and we must go hence, yet a little while and we must give up our account, we know not how to digest it; for we always took the vision to be for a great while to come, Ezek. 12:27. “Son of man, look, the house of Israel is saying, ‘The vision that he sees is for many days from now, and he prophesies of times far off.’
 2. Their willingness to be instructed. When they were at a loss about the meaning of Christs words, they conferred together upon it, and asked help of one another. Even today when we do not understand fully we ask others what they think. Though we cannot fully solve every difficulty we meet with in scripture, yet we must not therefore throw it off, but revolve what we cannot explain, and wait till God shall reveal even this unto usIt is not my will but your will oh Lord!
III. The further explication of what Christ had said.
1. See here why Christ explained it (John 16:19); Now Jesus knew that they desired to ask Him, and He said to them, Are you inquiring among yourselves about what I said, A little while, and you will not see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me
 
 because he knew they were desirous to ask him, and designed it. Note, The knots we cannot untie we must bring to him who alone can give an understanding. Christ knew they were desirous to ask him, but were bashful and ashamed to ask. Note, Christ takes cognizance of pious desires, though they be not as yet offered up, the groanings that cannot be uttered, and even anticipates them with the blessings of his goodnessChrist instructed those who he knew were desirous to ask him, though they did not ask. Before we call, he answers. Another reason why Christ explained it was because he observed them canvassing this matter among themselves: Do you enquire this among yourselves? Well, I will make it easy to you. This intimates to us who they are that Christ will teach: (1.) The humble, that confess their ignorance, for so much their enquiry implied. (2.) The diligent, that use the means they have: Do you enquire? You shall be taught. To him that hath shall be given.
2. See here how he explained it; not by a nice and critical play upon the words, but by bringing the thing more closely to them; he had told them of not seeing him, and seeing him, and they did not apprehend the meaning, and therefore he explains it by their sorrowing and rejoicing, because we commonly measure things according as they affect us (John 16:20):

 

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