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Hello my name is Jerral Campfield and this web site is dedicated to Moral Recognition Therapy using Biblical principles. Please come back often to join me in understanding Gods hands are outstretched still to forgive.

What is the day of Pentecost  E-mail
Contributed by Jerral Campfield   
Monday, 10 June 2019

What is the day of Pentecost?
day of PentecostQuestion: "What is the day of Pentecost?"

Answer: 
Pentecost is significant in both the Old and New Testaments. “Pentecost” is actually the Greek name for a festival known in the Old Testament as the Feast of Weeks (

Answer: Pentecost is significant in both the Old and New Testaments. “Pentecost” is actually the Greek name for a festival known in the Old Testament as the Feast of Weeks (Leviticus 23:15;The Feast of Weeks 15 d“You shall count seven full weeks from the day after the Sabbath, from the day that you brought the sheaf of the ywave offering.
 Deuteronomy 16:9).he Feast of Weeks s“You shall count seven weeks. Begin to count the seven weeks from the time the sickle is first put to the standing grain.
The Greek word means “fifty” and refers to the fifty days that have elapsed since the wave offering of Passover. The Feast of Weeks celebrated the end of the grain harvest. Most interesting, however, is its use in Joel and Acts. Looking back to Joel’s prophecy (Joel 2:28–32The Lord Will Pour Out His Spirit 
28 5 w“And it shall come to pass afterward, 
that xI will pour out my Spirit on all flesh; 
yyour sons and zyour daughters shall prophesy, 
your old men shall dream dreams, 
and your young men shall see visions. 
29 aEven on the male and female servants 
in those days I will pour out my Spirit. 
30 “And I will show bwonders in the heavens and bon the earth, blood and fire and columns of smoke. 31 cThe sun shall be turned to darkness, dand the moon to blood, ebefore the great and awesome day of the Lord comes. 32 And it shall come to pass that feveryone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved. gFor in Mount Zion and in Jerusalem there shall be those who escape, as the Lord has said, and among hthe survivors shall be those whom the Lord calls.
and forward to the promise of the Holy Spirit in Christ’s last words on earth before His ascension into heaven (Acts 1:8), But you will receive npower owhen the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and pyou will be qmy witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and rSamaria, and sto the end of the earth.”
Pentecost signals the beginning of the church age.
The only biblical reference to the actual events of Pentecostis Acts 2:1–3.When fthe day of Pentecost arrived, they were all together in one place. And suddenly there came from heaven a sound like ga mighty rushing wind, and hit filled the entire house where they were sitting. And divided tongues ias of fire appeared to them and rested1 on each one of them.
  Pentecost is reminiscent of the Last Supper; in both instances the disciples are together in a house for what proves to be an important event. At the Last Supper the disciples witness the end of the Messiah’s earthly ministry as He asks them to remember Him after His death until He returns. At Pentecost, the disciples witness the birth of the New Testament church in the coming of the Holy Spirit to indwell all believers. Thus the scene of the disciples in a room at Pentecost links the commencement of the Holy Spirit’s work in the church with the conclusion of Christ’s earthly ministry in the upper room before the crucifixion.
The description of fire and wind mentioned in the Pentecost account resounds throughout the Old and the New Testament. The sound of the wind at Pentecost was “rushing” and “mighty.” Scriptural references to the power of wind (always understood to be under God’s control) abound. Exodus 10:13;13 So Moses stretched out his staff over the land of Egypt, and the Lord brought an east wind upon the land all that day and all that night. When it was morning, the east wind had brought the locusts.
 
 
 Psalm 18:42I beat them fine as dust before the wind; 
I cast them out like the mire of the streets. 
 
and Isaiah 11:15 in the Old Testament15 And the Lord will utterly destroy2
qthe tongue of the Sea of Egypt, 
and will wave his hand over rthe River3
with his scorching breath,4
and strike it into seven channels, 
and he will lead people across in sandals.
 and Matthew 14:23–23 And after he had dismissed the crowds, nhe went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When oevening came, he was there alone, 24 but the boat by this time was a long way2 from the land,3 beaten by the waves, for the wind was against them. 25 And lin the fourth watch of the night4 he came to them, walking on the sea. 26 But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, pthey were terrified, and said, “It is a ghost!” and they cried out in fear. 27 But immediately Jesus spoke to them, saying, q“Take heart; it is I. qDo not be afraid.”


28 And Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” 29 He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat and rwalked on the water and came to Jesus. 30 But when he saw the wind,5 he was afraid, and beginning to sink he cried out, s“Lord, save me.” 31 Jesus immediately reached out his hand and took hold of him, saying to him, t“O you of little faith, why did you udoubt?” 32 And when they got into the boat, sthe wind ceased.
 
More significant than wind as power is wind as life in the Old Testament (Job 12:10In ihis hand is the life of every living thing and the breath of all mankind.
and as spirit in the New (John 3:8). vThe wind5 blows wwhere it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.”
Just as the first Adam received the breath of physical life (Genesis 2:7) , then the Lord God formed the man of bdust from the ground and cbreathed into his dnostrils the breath of life, and ethe man became a living creature.
so the second Adam, Jesus, brings the breath of spiritual life. The idea of spiritual life as generated by the Holy Spirit is certainly implicit in the sound of the wind at Pentecost.
Fire is often associated in the Old Testament with the presence of God (Exodus 3:2;xAnd ythe angel of the Lord appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush. He looked, and behold, the bush was burning, yet it was not consumed. 
 
 13:21–22And sthe Lord went before them by day in a pillar of cloud to lead them along the way, and by night in a pillar of fire to give them light, that they might travel by day and by night. 22 The pillar of cloud by day and the pillar of fire by night did not depart from before the people. 
 
24:1717 Now the appearance of the glory of the Lord was like a pdevouring fire on the top of the mountain in the sight of the people of Israel.
Isaiah 10:17)aThe light of Israel will become a fire, 
and bhis Holy One a flame, 
and cit will burn and devour 
his thorns and briers din one day. 
 
 and with His holiness (Psalm 97:3;Fire goes before him 
and burns up his adversaries all around.
 Malachi 3:2).But lwho can endure the day of his coming, and who can stand when he appears? For mhe is like a refiner’s fire and like fullers’ soap.
 Likewise, in the New Testament, fire is associated with the presence of God (Hebrews 12:29for our tGod is a consuming fire. 
 
and the purification He can bring about in human life (Revelation 3:18). counsel you vto buy from me gold refined by fire, so that you may be rich, and wwhite garments so that you may clothe yourself and xthe shame of your nakedness may not be seen, and salve to anoint your eyes, uso that you may see.
 God’s presence and holiness are implied in the Pentecostal tongues of fire. Indeed, fire is identified with Christ Himself (Revelation 1:14;The hairs of his head were white, like white wool, like snow. oHis eyes were like a flame of fire, 
 
 19:12); His eyes are like a flame of fire, and on his head are omany diadems, and he has pa name written that no one knows but himself.
this association naturally underlies the Pentecost gift of the Holy Spirit, who would teach the disciples the things of Christ (John 16:14). He will xglorify me, for he will take what is mine and declare it to you.

Another aspect of the Day of Pentecost is the miraculous speaking in foreign tongues which enabled people from various language groups to understand the message of the apostles. In addition is the bold and incisive preaching of Peter to a Jewish audience. The effect of the sermon was powerful, as listeners were “cut to the heart” (Acts 2:37)Now when mthey heard this they were cut to the heart, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, “Brothers, nwhat shall we do?
 and instructed by Peter to “repent, and be baptized” (Acts 2:38). And Peter said to them, o“Repent and pbe baptized every one of you qin the name of Jesus Christ rfor the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive sthe gift of the Holy Spirit.
The narrative concludes with three thousand souls being added to the fellowship, the breaking of bread and prayers, apostolic signs and wonders, and a community in which everyone’s needs were met.


Copyright 2005 Jerral Campfield, All rights reserved.