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Hello my name is Jerral Campfield and this web site is dedicated to Moral Recognition Therapy using Biblical principles. Please come back often to join me in understanding Gods hands are outstretched still to forgive.

The question of what is sin!  E-mail
Contributed by Jerral Campfield   
Friday, 06 October 2017

I realize we are in a world that God seems to be letting Satan have more authority and know without a shadow of doubt, we are all living in a world that is out of order. Education, government, our economy and religion is not able to saves from the addictions of sin.

Life requires we all work to fight sin that wants to abuse us and cause us to be addicted to wrongs that are destroying civility and breaking up countries from within. We all have natural bodies that want to be normal doing what is wrong for we are born sinners. God created us good, but make choice to eat what God told him not to, so God placed a curse upon men and women called sin. Sin is simply doing what we are told not to do. So, sin is anything that we do that brings addictions to where we can’t help from dipping into it. Flip Wilson used the Phrase, “Satan made me do it.” No Satan did not, sin happens normally. When I do not listen to God, for God gave us a law in the Old Testament and when we broke the law we would have to offer a sacrifice to be forgiven, then not do it again, or we would have to offer a sacrifice again. Then Jesus came to this earth as a baby and went through all we will ever go through, yet without sin. He was tried and found to be at fault and Barabbas the criminal was released and Jesus was crucified. What an injustice, but yet Jesus, died and was buried and after three days, He arose from the grave and appear to man for 40 days showing He was alive. Then He said to the Disciple to wait in the upper room for the Holy Spirit that will be just like me without limitations who will be present to empower us to not continue in sin, once we were willing to abide in the vine; Jesus.

We like to misuse or abuse our lives and it brings emotional mental addictions. These abuses bring change in the way we deal with life and others for we can’t see reality of what sin is doing. We become dependent upon sin to survive, as it causes us to develop tolerance and we keep; on sinning. Thinking it is ok, only to find we can’t quit, or stop for we have been addicted without any sense of wrong doing. So, all relationship with family and loved ones suffers and it brings forth a poor self-image, to where it affects our health, personal finance, and security of jobs.  Even our pride of ownership become sloppy and junkie, for we cannot see the need for order of what the truth really does or is. So, we are living in a world of, I wish, rather than I can, let’s do not deny we have a sin, but see the need we all have of being a blessing and not a curse.

I hope as you look at yourself you know who you are? Where you are, on this great big planet and where you’re going to go after you die? God created good and evil, wrong and right, heaven and hell; healthy and sickly and it is up to us to make good positive choices that give us assurance, we are created by God, to become better and better, as we learn the consequences of sin. Sin hurts and that is the job of Satan who was cast out of heaven and he is still mad and wants to take you with him. So be careful you know the answers to the reason we sin and resist serving your addictions to wrong and give God a change to rule and reign over your life, so you can be set free of the addictions of sin.

I am saddened by what happen in Los Vegas when Stephen Paddock committed the biggest mass murder in American history. Then to see the destruction caused by the Hurricanes, volcanos, earthquakes, flooding, forest fires, lawlessness and killings of innocent people give reason to wonder where is God? Yet it is the heart of a man that is disparately wicked that needs to watch, wait and see what God wants to do in our lives, so we can abide in Him and begin to bear goodwill and peace in our area of influence.

Sin is what God calls an act of rebellion that is a transgression against Gods Divine law. Sin can be viewed as any thought, or action that endangers the ideal relationship between an individual and their God or Gods, or as any diversion from the perceived ideal order for human life. The bible says it is missing the mark or target. There are sins of ignorance, and sins of omission.

The following is from the web got question.org/sin that I thought was very good and makes one think about who we are?
Question: "What is the definition of sin?"
Answer: Sin is described in the Bible as transgression of the law of God (1 John 3:4) and rebellion against God (Deuteronomy 9:7Joshua 1:18). Sin had its beginning with Lucifer, probably the most beautiful and powerful of the angels. Not content with his position, he desired to be higher than God, and that was his downfall, the beginning of sin (Isaiah 14:12-15). Renamed Satan, he brought sin to the human race in the Garden of Eden, where he tempted Adam and Eve with the same enticement, “you shall be like God.” Genesis 3 describes Adam and Eve’s rebellion against God and against His command. Since that time, sin has been passed down through all the generations of mankind and we, Adam’s descendants, have inherited sin from him. Romans 5:12 tells us that through Adam sin entered the world, and so death was passed on to all men because “the wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23).

Through Adam, the inherent inclination to sin entered the human race, and human beings became sinners by nature. When Adam sinned, his inner nature was transformed by his sin of rebellion, bringing to him spiritual death and depravity which would be passed on to all who came after him. We are sinners not because we sin; rather, we sin because we are sinners. This passed-on depravity is known as inherited sin. Just as we inherit physical characteristics from our parents, we inherit our sinful natures from Adam. King David lamented this condition of fallen human nature in 
Psalm 51:5: “Surely I was sinful at birth, sinful from the time my mother conceived me.”

Another type of sin is known as imputed sin. Used in both financial and legal settings, the Greek word translated “imputed” means “to take something that belongs to someone and credit it to another’s account.” Before the Law of Moses was given, sin was not imputed to man, although men were still sinners because of inherited sin. After the Law was given, sins committed in violation of the Law were imputed (accounted) to them (
Romans 5:13). Even before transgressions of the law were imputed to men, the ultimate penalty for sin (death) continued to reign (Romans 5:14). All humans, from Adam to Moses, were subject to death, not because of their sinful acts against the Mosaic Law (which they did not have), but because of their own inherited sinful nature. After Moses, humans were subject to death both because of inherited sin from Adam and imputed sin from violating the laws of God.

God used the principle of imputation to benefit mankind when He imputed the sin of believers to the account of Jesus Christ, who paid the penalty for that sin—death—on the cross. Imputing our sin to Jesus, God treated Him as if He were a sinner, though He was not, and had Him die for the sins of the entire world (
1 John 2:2). It is important to understand that sin was imputed to Him, but He did not inherit it from Adam. He bore the penalty for sin, but He never became a sinner. His pure and perfect nature was untouched by sin. He was treated as though He were guilty of all the sins ever committed by the human race, even though He committed none. In exchange, God imputed the righteousness of Christ to believers and credited our accounts with His righteousness, just as He had credited our sins to Christ’s account (2 Corinthians 5:21).

A third type of sin is personal sin, that which is committed every day by every human being. Because we have inherited a sin nature from Adam, we commit individual, personal sins, everything from seemingly innocent untruths to murder. Those who have not placed their faith in Jesus Christ must pay the penalty for these personal sins, as well as inherited and imputed sin. However, believers have been freed from the eternal penalty of sin—hell and spiritual death—but now we also have the power to resist sinning. Now we can choose whether or not to commit personal sins because we have the power to resist sin through the Holy Spirit who dwells within us, sanctifying and convicting us of our sins when we do commit them (
Romans 8:9-11). Once we confess our personal sins to God and ask forgiveness for them, we are restored to perfect fellowship and communion with Him. “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).

We are all three times condemned due to inherited sin, imputed sin, and personal sin. The only just penalty for this sin is death (
Romans 6:23), not just physical death but eternal death (Revelation 20:11-15). Thankfully, inherited sin, imputed sin, and personal sin have all been crucified on the cross of Jesus, and now by faith in Jesus Christ as the Savior “we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of His grace” (Ephesians 1:7).

Through Adam, the inherent inclination to sin entered the human race, and human beings became sinners by nature. When Adam sinned, his inner nature was transformed by his sin of rebellion, bringing to him spiritual death and depravity which would be passed on to all who came after him. We are sinners not because we sin; rather, we sin because we are sinners. This passed-on depravity is known as inherited sin. Just as we inherit physical characteristics from our parents, we inherit our sinful natures from Adam. King David lamented this condition of fallen human nature in Psalm 51:5: “Surely I was sinful at birth, sinful from the time my mother conceived me.”
Another type of sin is known as imputed sin. Used in both financial and legal settings, the Greek word translated “imputed” means “to take something that belongs to someone and credit it to another’s account.” Before the Law of Moses was given, sin was not imputed to man, although men were still sinners because of inherited sin. After the Law was given, sins committed in violation of the Law were imputed (accounted) to them (Romans 5:13). Even before transgressions of the law were imputed to men, the ultimate penalty for sin (death) continued to reign (Romans 5:14). All humans, from Adam to Moses, were subject to death, not because of their sinful acts against the Mosaic Law (which they did not have), but because of their own inherited sinful nature. After Moses, humans were subject to death both because of inherited sin from Adam and imputed sin from violating the laws of God.
God used the principle of imputation to benefit mankind when He imputed the sin of believers to the account of Jesus Christ, who paid the penalty for that sin—death—on the cross. Imputing our sin to Jesus, God treated Him as if He were a sinner, though He was not, and had Him die for the sins of the entire world (1 John 2:2). It is important to understand that sin was imputed to Him, but He did not inherit it from Adam. He bore the penalty for sin, but He never became a sinner. His pure and perfect nature was untouched by sin. He was treated as though He were guilty of all the sins ever committed by the human race, even though He committed none. In exchange, God imputed the righteousness of Christ to believers and credited our accounts with His righteousness, just as He had credited our sins to Christ’s account (2 Corinthians 5:21).
A third type of sin is personal sin, that which is committed every day by every human being. Because we have inherited a sin nature from Adam, we commit individual, personal sins, everything from seemingly innocent untruths to murder. Those who have not placed their faith in Jesus Christ must pay the penalty for these personal sins, as well as inherited and imputed sin. However, believers have been freed from the eternal penalty of sin—hell and spiritual death—but now we also have the power to resist sinning. Now we can choose whether or not to commit personal sins because we have the power to resist sin through the Holy Spirit who dwells within us, sanctifying and convicting us of our sins when we do commit them (Romans 8:9-11). Once we confess our personal sins to God and ask forgiveness for them, we are restored to perfect fellowship and communion with Him. “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).
We are all three times condemned due to inherited sin, imputed sin, and personal sin. The only just penalty for this sin is death (Romans 6:23), not just physical death but eternal death (Revelation 20:11-15). Thankfully, inherited sin, imputed sin, and personal sin have all been crucified on the cross of Jesus, and now by faith in Jesus Christ as the Savior “we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of His grace” (Ephesians 1:7).
I trust your seeing the need to turn your lives over to abiding in the vine; Jesus so you can bear fruit that benefits you and all around you?


Copyright 2005 Jerral Campfield, All rights reserved.